Eve: Stripped, Mocked, and Shamed

For the last two weeks, we saw that Woman was innocent, perfect, and powerful. She was fully known to herself, her husband, and her God. Woman had no reason to fear the corners and undercurrents of her heart, mind, or soul. She had absolutely nothing to hide and no trust issues.

We have finally arrived at Genesis 3 and it’s going to take some time to set up the context. Here are some details to consider:

  • Both Trees (Life and Knowledge of Good and Evil) were placed at the center of the Garden (Gen. 2:9)
  • Adam was tasked with filling, subduing, the earth; ruling all living things (Gen. 1:28); and managing the Garden (Gen. 2:15).
  • Most commentaries suggest that the command not to eat of The Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil was given from God to Adam (Gen. 2:15-17). Then Adam passed it on to Woman.
  • Satan is too smooth to use a startling, scary method of temptation, therefore, it’s possible that animals (or at least snakes) originally spoke.
  • Adam was nearby when Woman was being tempted (Gen. 3:6).

Keep these details in mind while we dive into Genesis 3:1.

Let’s set the scene: Woman, ezer, and Adam, steward, were in the center of the garden near the two trees—The Tree of Life and The Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil. This does not necessarily mean that they were flirting with temptation; as the gardeners and stewards, both man and woman had the right and responsibility to tend to all that lived.

Many expect Woman to be seeking trouble that day, but she didn’t have to look for it. It is entirely possible that Woman was simply caught up in Satan’s hidden agenda. In my opinion, Satan tempted Woman while she was operating in her gifting and calling. He engaged her in what must have been a fairly benign (from Woman’s standpoint) conversation.

God told Adam that he could eat freely of any tree in the Garden, except one, otherwise he would die (Gen. 2:16-17). Satan, however, exaggerated the limitation, excluded the consequences, and suggested a gap in the provision of God (Gen. 3:1).

Woman acknowledges God’s provision, but adds a little caveat to the original command: she says that she can’t even touch the fruit or she’ll die (Gen. 3:3).

Who knows whether Adam or Woman added that little hedge of protection around God’s command? Most religions start off with the same kind of innocent bumper for sin. But here’s the problem: God will not provide the consequence to a command he never gave.

When Woman touches the fruit in Gen. 3:6, nothing happens. Suddenly, there’s the possibility that God is lying.

But I’m getting ahead of myself. There’s one more detail I’d like to point out. If we can assume that Woman was fulfilling her calling and gifting to help Adam in his responsibilities, then what Mr. Snake suggests next is crucial.

He says that the fruit will grant wisdom (Gen. 3:5). The Hebrew word used here is saw-kal, which means to have skill, understand, and guide (Strong 535). Remember, if Woman wasn’t willfully eyeing this fruit, then she was performing her job—to be the in-the-nick-of-time help for Adam— and what better tool could she use than wisdom?

Next, Woman double-checks her information. She knew God created the fruit and trees in the Garden to be pleasing to the eyes and good to eat (Gen. 2:8). So she examined the fruit and found it pleasant to the eye and good to eat (3:6). It appeared to align with what God had planned, just as Satan knew it would.

I’m not saying that Woman is the victim and isn’t responsible for her choice. Ultimately, she chose to believe Satan and disobey God. But what I’m seeing here is a pattern that the Enemy has used on me over and over again.

What I’m seeing is a tailor-made trap to strip Woman of her God, her power, and her dignity.

 

Strong, James. “Sakal.” The New Strong’s Complete Dictionary of Bible Words, Thomas Nelson, 1996, pp. 535.

Eve: The Original Wonder Woman

Here’s a quick recap of last week’s post— Woman was created:

  • Innocent,
  • Perfect,
  • Last,
  • In the image of God,
  • For relationship with God and Adam,
  • In the garden of Eden,
  • And shamelessly, happily, and blessedly naked.

In short, Eve was exactly who God said she was.

Let’s look at the God-designed context of her creation: Genesis 2:7 explains how God made Man, 2:18 states that Adam was alone, and 2:22 describes that God made Woman out of Adam.

Between Adam’s creation and Woman’s creation, God put Adam to work naming all the animals God had created (Gen. 2:18-20). Talk about a long day. Why didn’t God give that assignment after Woman was created? She could’ve taken half of the animals and helped get the job done in half the time.

Instead of detailing all the creativity and wonder of Adam as he named every living thing that could move on its own, Genesis 2:20 focuses on the search for a helper comparable to Adam. Despite all the diversity of creation, Adam came up empty.

During this time, Adam discovered that he was the only one who was alone in his kind and his responsibilities. Then God, in his mercy, remedied the situation by creating Woman out of Adam’s rib (Gen. 2:21-22).

Woman filled the only void that existed in creation and God made sure that Adam knew it. She was the companion in mind, body, and spirit that he needed. But, wait! There’s more.

The Hebrew word ezer is typically translated as “helper” (Strong 42). I don’t know about you, but that feels a bit First Grade to me. Not flattering.

However, this word is only used twenty-one times in the Old Testament. Eighteen of those times, ezer refers to God’s divine intervention on behalf of his children who are on the cusp of disaster.

One of the remaining references is a negative (Is. 30:5). In other words, that verse is saying, “Dude, you are so not helping.” The last two refer to Woman.

Breathe this fact in until it mingles with your toes, my friend: The positive identifications of ezer only refer to God and to Woman.

Based on the uses throughout the Old Testament, here’s my functional definition of ezer: powerful, overwhelming, in-the-nick-of-time military help. Think Gideon with three hundred men carrying jars and torches defeating well-trained, well-armed soldiers. Jericho’s walls collapsing at the sound of a worship service. A stone toppling a giant.

That’s the word God uses to describe Woman.

That’s the mold in which you and I were made: that of a powerful warrior lending aid to an ally.

Woman not only kept Adam from aloneness, but she was empowered to render the essential assistance he needed to carry out his purpose: The steward, filling and subduing the earth, and governing all living things.

How breath-taking. What a mission. What a woman she must have been. Woman was fully confident, fully capable, and fully empowered to assist in the exact moment and the exact manner that was needed.

No wonder Satan went after her.

 

Strong, James. “Ezer.” The New Strong’s Complete Dictionary of Bible Words, Thomas Nelson, 1996, pp. 472.

Eve: The Face Behind the Blame

What would you give to know that who you are, what you look like, where you are, and what you’re doing is precisely perfect?

We can get close, but sin keeps us from fully walking in that assurance. We can thank Eve for that one, right? Without her, we’d be sun-bathing in paradise right now.

Before we start resenting her cravings, however, let’s pause to consider who she was before she lost everything. Because, make no mistake, if anyone knew who and why she was, it was Eve.

Woman was created in the image of God (Gen. 1:27). Shifting his creation technique, God meticulously crafted man and woman. He touched them—molded them like a potter with clay (Gen. 2:7, 21-22). That’s intimate—a tactile process that the rest of creation doesn’t share.

Whereas Adam seems to be fashioned outside of the garden, then placed there, (Gen. 2:7-8,15), Eve seems to be created inside the Garden (2:21-22).

God created the garden to provide pleasure, purpose, sustenance, and access to his presence (Gen. 2:9). Adam was brought into Paradise. Eve was made for Paradise. She knew nothing but comprehensive pleasure, purpose, sustenance, and access to God.

She was also created for Adam—she was his physical, emotional, and relational match.

Let this saturate your soul: Woman was crafted at the end of creation to fill a specific, God-designed void (Gen. 2:20).

Imagine the freedom, delight, and fulfillment she must have experienced! Woman was needed, wanted, and perfectly equipped to fulfill each God-designed aspect of her niche.

She was innocent of all doubt, insecurity, fear, or stress.

Yeah, but then she started talking to snakes, you might be thinking. That’s true. Eve screwed up. So have I. Haven’t you?

My biggest, most shameful screw-up is the last thing I want people to remember me by. But that is exactly the legacy we assign Eve. Why?

Perhaps there is power in knowing the mold we were crafted in. If so, I can think of no better tactic for the Enemy than to get us caught up with the blame game. In fact, that’s precisely what has occurred in western civilization since the fall—women consistently have been considered Jezebels who must be controlled and trained to stay in their place.

I want to explore the grace, mercy, and God-ordained vengeance that Eve inspired at her darkest moment. Perhaps her story can give us a bit of light for our own path as women. Join me?

“You could make this all go away!”– Emery

What do you do when you know that God can but you don’t know if God will?

Or where is God when good things happen to bad people and bad things happen to good people?

If you look back through your life, I’m sure there are many shadows that defy a good, solid “Look at what God has done” proclamations. There sure are in mine.

Those are the moments that we kinda shuffle from our memories and avoid bringing up in conversations, particularly with unbelievers.

In fact, that is probably why we all dread that moment when darkness envelopes a friend, coworker, family member, or acquaintance with tragedy or depression.

Because we Christians, the ones who believe in a loving, all-powerful God are confronted through our friend’s grief with our own doubt: can God really be good if he allows these horrendous circumstances?

My life has been far from shiny. There are rusted, rotted, rank moments, days, weeks, even years where the easy answer that God is good rings just a bit hollow.

Many days I spend asking God why, if he loves me so much, he doesn’t get off his butt and help me.

In fact, this week has been another such moment where life, calling, and God’s character are not adding up. Then I read Isaiah 50.

In Isaiah 50, God’s prophet details his troubles. Abuse is a good word for the treatment Isaiah suffered at the hands of God’s own people (does that resonate with anyone else who has spent time around the Church and been burned, or is that just me?).

Here is a man who was the mouthpiece of God for years. That would have to be a pretty intimate relationship between God and Isaiah.

And yet Isaiah struggled with abuse, depression, death threats, and suicidal thoughts.

Why didn’t God take that away? Based on what he proclaimed and worked through Isaiah, it wasn’t an issue of impotence. But God didn’t take those things away.

Here’s what Isaiah says in the midst of abuse:

  • “But the Lord God helps me; therefore I have not been disgraced,” (Isaiah 50:7, ESV),
  • “Behold, the Lord God helps me” (Isaiah 50:9, ESV), and finally,
  • “Let him who walks in darkness and has no light trust in the name of the Lord and rely on his God” (Isaiah 50:10, ESV).

There are many other instances where Isaiah’s attitude was a bit more bleak. The comfort there is that we know that even a prophet of God can droop under the weight of divine purpose on a profane planet.

The book of Isaiah offers us an intimate view of God in the midst of darkness, both internal and external. It proclaims the faithfulness of God even when the circumstances don’t make sense.

We will never know all of what God is doing and all of who God is. If we could, what would be the point of faith?

But we can trust that no matter how dark our days get, the Lord our God is right there with us, watching our steps, picking us up when we fall, and beating back more enemies than we would be comfortable knowing are out there watching our steps.

There is no easy answer in our dark days. But there is a God who invites us to cry out, shake our fists, and ask the hard questions. He is not threatened by our confusion and doubt.

This week has been dark for me. But I’m choosing to believe that God is actively working in my favor, doing things on my behalf that would stagger me with the force of his love if only I knew.

I may never know the whys behind my dark days, but I can know the God who is bigger than the dark days.

Song credit goes to Emery’s “The Less You Say,” from You Were Never Alone.

The Eternal Bubble Bath: Sabbath

Yesterday, I practiced my first Sabbath.

This may seem silly since we all have Sundays, but I’m currently working my way through Priscilla Shirer’s Breathe with my women’s Bible study. Granted, we only started it last Wednesday, but it has been dovetailing perfectly with the promptings and yearnings in my own spirit for the last year.

Did you know that Sabbath actually means to experience “tranquility, serenity, peace and repose” (Ibid qtd. Shirer 15)?

And that when God rested on the seventh day and made it holy, He was expressing satisfaction (Shirer 15)?

Over the last year, God has patiently been walking me baby step by baby step towards Sabbath. It’s taken me a year to sort through many of my identity issues (not fix, mind you, but at least they’re labeled and organized).

Since writing this blog forced me to walk through some warfare and shifts in perspective on my context (the war zone we live in and the romance of Christ), I’ve begun to think differently. I’ve become uncomfortable, even discontent in my life of apathy, guilt, and insecurity.

In order to deal with some of this mess, God and I retreated last Fall. What did we discuss?

My home décor.

It sounds absurd, but God knew that what I had allowed into my house and the furniture and knick-knacks I arranged did not suit the home my husband and I wanted to share. It wasn’t the home God wanted us to invite people into. It was directly contrary to the purpose He has for us: deliberate, Christ-centered conversation.

Having in an unexpected rush moved into a new home several weeks ago, Fritz and I automatically saw it as an opportunity to rid ourselves of clutter and confusion. Our home now matches the purpose and style God showed me five months ago.

What does this have to do with Sabbath, you ask?

Well.

How many of you come across a new spiritual revelation and immediately start lists, schedules, and plans to implement that revelation and fail almost immediately? In case you didn’t notice, both my hands are up.

Sabbath is about rest.

Repose.

Tranquility.

That can’t be muscled into your life. And, if you’re anything like me, it can’t be thought into your life either because your brain is caught in a hamster wheel.

The beauty of this last year is that God, knowing that Sabbath would be a big part of my spring, began last summer to rewrite my thinking and identity so that instead of charging in and taking control of Sabbath (which defeats the purpose of tranquility), I’d ease into Sabbath like a warm bath.

Will there be relapses? That, friend, is what grace is for.

However, yesterday, I allowed God to set up my Sabbath and I’m celebrating by sharing what it was:

Sabbath is looking back through your life and seeing all the hundred thousand ways God has blessed you. All the dreams He fulfilled without you noticing. All the struggles you’ve overcome by His power. All the goals you’ve accomplished and never celebrated.

On my Sabbath, I looked and saw a God who loves me and blesses me without measure.

Shirer, Priscilla. Breathe: Making Room for Sabbath. 2nd ed. LifeWay Press. 2014.

Sunshine Through the Darkness

Life is not very kind.

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Have you noticed that? I certainly have. Particularly lately. God has been walking me back through the scrapes, miseries, and heartaches in my life.

Some of the scrapes were my own sin bringing me to my knees, but much of it smacked me sideways when I felt most safe and secure. Not wanting to relive those memories, I asked God why I had to remember such heart-sore times. After a few more weeks of memories, this was my answer:

God is reminding me of His faithfulness to me.

Many people assume that Christianity is the “EASY” button. That Christ somehow makes everything easier and smoother as soon as you sign up. That certainly has not been my experience. The more I press into my relationship with Christ, the more difficult my life seems to get.

In fact, Jesus straight-up tells us “In the world you will have tribulation” (John 16:33, ESV). Sounds like fun, right? Not only did Jesus tell us, he walked painful, blistered steps through temptation, deprivation, torture and death that most of us could not conceive.

The apostle Paul reinforces this theology of suffering like this:

“Yes, and all who desire to live godly in Christ Jesus will suffer persecution” (2 Timothy 3:12) and “But you be watchful in all things, endure afflictions, do the work of an evangelist, fulfill your ministry” (2 Timothy 4:5).

design-1162241_1280We daughters of the King were not called to luxury and ease in this lifetime. We were called to suffer. Why?

Phillip Keller answers that question this way:

“I know of nothing which so stimulates my faith in my Heavenly Father as to look back and reflect on His faithfulness to me in every crisis and every chilling circumstance of life” (80).

Let’s return to John 16:33. “In the world you will have tribulation. But take heart; I have overcome the world” (John 16:33, ESV, emphasis mine).

Jesus came to walk through our suffering and temptations. He came to die. But make no mistake, the cross was not the end. Jesus came to die so that he could live.

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If Jesus had stayed dead, there would be no gospel. He would have succumbed to the ultimate consequence of sin: eternal separation from God with a side order of death.

Jesus came be resurrected. By coming back to life, Jesus defeated death and sin for all people who would call on his name. Because he came back to life, our suffering has purpose. It has meaning.

No matter how much you suffer, Jesus has suffered more in your place. He has himself borne the sting of death so we won’t have to.

Yes, we still suffer. Living in a fallen world, hostile to our Father, we should expect to experience suffering.

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But there is beauty in our suffering because of the goodness of our God. Our suffering can bring us into more intimate knowledge of our God than we could ever achieve without it.

Suffering allows you to see your all-powerful Creator God step into your suffering and walk through it carrying you, his Beloved.

Jesus experiences your torment with you. He shields you from the brunt of your suffering. He carries you when you’re too weak to walk.

What an intimate knowledge of our God! You and I get to experience the peace and presence of God. Our suffering provides the opportunity to proclaim with confidence that

“My God will hear me…. [W]hen I fall, I shall rise; when I sit in darkness, the Lord will be a light to me” (Micah 7:7-8).

How else will we be confident in God’s presence and peace until we have experienced it?

None of the suffering you experience has not been endured by Jesus. What’s more, no measure of suffering you experience do you experience alone.

Even in the bleakest darkness, our God is faithful.

Dangerous Reflections

Genesis 1:26-7 reveals that the Trinity’s intention in creating man and woman was to reflect His likeness. We are made in His image.

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I believe God gives us a little glimpse into what that means by giving us children and bloodlines. When I was 8, I couldn’t tell which school photograph was mine and which was my dad’s.

When I teach and a student says something demeaning of themselves, you can believe I sound like my mother. I even stand like her and use the same gestures.

I reflect my parents, some in looks and some in personality. My sisters, neices and nephews all very obviously belong in my family. We’re unique, but we reflect one another.

That is what I believe Genesis 1:26-27 is talking about. We are each unique, but if you look closely enough, you can tell we belong to the same Daddy.

And I believe that each sex has something unique that captures a different facet of God that the other is missing.

Most women seem to have three things in common: passion, relationships, and communication.

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I recognize that not all women are the same. I am as bizarre and oddly female as they come. Just ask my Bible study ladies. They have been wondering about me for some time now.

Regardless of the specifics, women long for relationship of some sort, be it romantic, soul-friends, or just acquaintences. We want to be known. And we go out of our way to communicate with others in order to achieve that “known-ness.”

Some of the women I know prefer online relationships and are silent in the face of another person. Other women want to be a couple inches away from your face as they communicate their depth.

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But here is what makes us unique from men: we want to communicate ourselves deeply and fully, sharing our experiences, joys, sorrows, and confusion with one another.

Maybe it’s just me, but men tend to share information. Women share life.

So how does that reflect God? Consider Genesis 1. God existed in perfect relationship with himself. He needed nothing, but He created the world, everything in it, and a man and a woman.

He walked with Adam and Eve in the cool of the day (Gen 3:8). Why? Considering His track record, I’d expect He wanted relationship.

And then, when Adam and Eve chose themselves over Him, God sent His Son, who would be a sacrifice so pure, it would restore our relationship with God forever.

Our craving for relationship as women seems to stem directly from our Father who made us.

In addition to restoring a relationship with rebellious people instead of destroying them, God spent thousands of years and used dozens of authors to put His heart and soul into a 66 book love letter to us.

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Then He sent a part of himself (the Holy Spirit) to live in us and translate His word so we would understand the depth of love He put into that letter and the character of the One who crafted it.

I’d say the desire for communication seems pretty familiar as well.

You and I reflect the image of God. And if we truly grasped and experienced the depth of His extravagant love for us? If we explored the depth of His character and allowed Him to do the same with us?

That right there, friend, is what Satan is so afraid of. 

If we experienced the depth of relationship and love with the God of Time itself that He wants us to, there is no power in this universe that could keep us quiet. 

Because we as women have the capacity for passion, relationship, and communication that makes us dangerous to the kingdom of Hell.

A Soldier’s Choice

Being beloved by God can sustain you and me through more than I think we really understand. But it is not enough to know that he loves us.

We have to realize, accept, and live out the fact that we are in a battle and, make no mistake, there is no Switzerland.soldiers-1002_1280

Either you are the Enemy’s or you are Christ’s. If you don’t know where you fall, check out “Love me! Why?” and “Christian: A Murky Mirror” in my sidebar.

Being a warrior in the field for Christ comes down to one powerful thing: Obedience.

Sounds boring and chauvenistic, doesn’t it? It’s not. Obedience to Christ is crucial to survival.

We will not survive this war, much less win if we don’t listen to and follow our Commanding Officer’s orders.

God is omnipotent (all-powerful), omniscient (all-knowing), omnipresent (everywhere), and eternal (timeless– without beginning or end).

Looking at that list, I’d say he is more than qualified to call the shots on a war that has raged longer than anyone besides him can out-live or remember.

Obviously, a key part of obedience is knowing his commands. So dive into the word of God (the Bible) and see what he says. Then act on it.

German theologian Dietrich Bonhoeffer puts it this way:

“Who stands fast?” he asked. “Only the man whose final standard is not his reason, his principles, his conscience, his freedom, or his virtue, but who is ready to sacrifice all this when he is called to obedient and responsible action in faith and in exclusive allegiance to God— the responsible man, who tries to make his whole life an answer to the question and call of God” (qtd. Metaxas).

Obedience is rarely a simple agreement that what God says sounds good, makes sense, or suited “that” situation. Obedience to God is a single-minded devotion that, as Bonhoeffer states, “requires a body.”

The Bible states quite clearly that “If you love me, you will keep my commandments” (John 14:15), “For we are His workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand that we should walk in them” (Eph. 2:10, ESV, emphasis mine), and “But be doers of the word, and not hearers only, deceiving yourselves” (James 1:22, ESV, emphasis mine).

God is telling us to act in obedience for our own safety and well-being.

Does that seem a bit controlling and narrow-minded to you? Consider it this way: if all the soldiers in an army did whatever they wanted, how many wars would they win?

How many lives would be wasted because the soldiers refused to listen to the commanding officer who knows the enemy and knows that the way that seems clear is actually an ambush waiting to happen?

We are soldiers in a war.

It is your choice as to whether you live in obedience to the Commander who values your safety and well-being as much as he values the outcome of the war or die on the battlefield because you want to do things your way.

Confused, Alone, and Discouraged

Once we believe that Jesus is the Son of God who came to save us,  we stumble through a little prayer, then are pronounced Christians.

A Bible is dropped in our laps, we’re told to go to church, and be “Christians.” And that is the extent of our education.

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But what about those of us who actually have a sense of humor or– God forbid– adventure? Or life is so busy we can barely breathe much less devote an hour to read and try to understand the Bible?

Or we fall asleep praying because, let’s face it, talking to the ceiling just ain’t what it’s cracked up to be? Or the unthinkable happens and God doesn’t answer our prayer? 

Everyone else seems to get it and look great but here you are drowning with a good Christian smile on your face?

Or you have a fantastic walk with the Lord but you’re alone, lonely, discouraged, and wondering what in the world is so unlovable about you?

I’ve been there.

And there is hope. Do you know why I’m sitting here writing this? Dragging my little black moleskin and Bic pen up mountains, into deserts, across state lines, to work, into my backyard, and to bed with me?

Because I’ve been there. And one thing that the church, bless its little heart, is doing wrong is allowing its women to drown in insecurity, anxiety, and despair.

We have not been equipped to be Christians. We have not be equipped to be warriors. And we certainly have not been equipped to be women.

That is why I’m writing this blog. I am done watching women like me drown in churches with smiles on their faces and broken hearts stuffed up their sleeves.

I am not an expert, but God has led me through more swamps and dark places than I care to remember most days. And he has taught me a few things.

I want to share what I’ve learned. Hopefully it will help you. And hopefully it will help you avoid some of the traps I’ve stumbled into.

For now, just know that God really does love you. He has never left you. And he never will.

 

Broken and Enslaved

I am no match for Satan and neither are you.

The power of God which raised Jesus from the dead is more than a match for Satan. So, again, how is it that I am a threat? Because God freely gave me that power (Eph. 1:19-20).

No, I’m not God’s super-secret, superhuman weapon dressed in black leather and armed with nasty little toys to take down the Enemy.

God gives all his believers power to defeat Satan. That’s part of the deal.

Then why aren’t all Christians attacked? They are. Look at our churches. At your neighbors. Our Christian brothers and sisters are asleep! It’s as though they stumbled onto the Island of the Lotus Eaters, ate the flowers, and forgotten their homes, identity, and mission.

So maybe I should say they’ve been captured and put in POW camps. From what I see, they are so used to it, they no longer want the sunshine.
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Most of us American Christians never knew that there was a battle raging for our minds and hearts. If we did know, we stopped using the power God gave us because

A) there are so many distractions in life, and

B) there are so many distractions in life.

In the Church in Nicaragua, however, warfare and Body maintenance are taken very seriously. To become a member of a local church, a person must successfully complete the two-year trial period!

What is the trial? Prioritizing the Body over everything else. That means that when a mission trip comes up, you are available. A person needs a place to stay, your home is theirs. If work conflicts with a church service, you go to church.

Can you imagine doing that? I can’t either. However, there is a woman there who so desires to be part of the church that she has gone through several jobs because the church takes precedence. And God has provided every time.

When I think of my life and my commitment to church, I think of a two hours on Sunday and three hours on Wednesday night. With occasional “vacation” from the rigors of church attendance.

Sure, I help out when someone needs a meal. If I have time and can juggle my schedule.

Church is not my number-one, prepare my heart all week, apply the message to my life, and fight for and serve the Body every day, no matter the consequences, focus of my life.

There are too many other shiny things that distract me– like snuggly, warm covers on a cold morning; grading that extra stack of papers; attempting to tame my jungle out back; going on a breakfast date with my husband; going to see a students’ football game; grocery shopping; or laundry.

None of these things are inherently bad (well, maybe laundry…). However, and here’s where the POW American Church comes in, when my to do list and hobbies become my priority over my God and his Body, I have just handed Satan my free will, stepped into the dungeon, and chained myself to a wall.

Suddenly, I am so anxious, harried, focused, exhausted, and driven that my heart and mind are no longer 100% surrendered to my Lord. In fact, most of the time we wander or rush through life not even hearing our Lord. To be perfectly blunt, most Christians look exactly like Non-Christians.

So maybe you’re right. Christians aren’t being attacked. They’ve been overcome. Maybe because they’re too busy being Americans to live like Christians. Or, maybe it’s because they aren’t actually Christians.